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This set of Frequently Asked Questions is about the MOST program in general. Please also see:

Why do families have to pay part of the tuition?

One key component of educational success is parental involvement. Making a financial sacrifice is a strong incentive for getting, and keeping, parents involved in their children’s schools and in the educational process. A MOST Scholarship is a hand-up, not a handout.

Can MOST recipients use the scholarship at any private school?

MOST scholarships may be used at any of our partner schools, which include most private and parochial schools in the Memphis metro area.

Who is eligible for the scholarships?

Families with children entering preschool, kindergarten, or first grade in the fall of the year the scholarship is awarded may apply if they believe they are financially eligible. These families must fall below the maximum income requirements, with the guidelines for the National School Lunch Program forming the basis for the MOST scale. The scale for MOST scholarships includes those who need help paying for tuition but whose income is a little more than the Lunch Program allows, up to 270 percent of the poverty level. Financial information is gathered from parents each year, and they must requalify to remain in the MOST program. We also have an attendance requirement for the students, and the parents must remain financially responsible for their portion of tuition payments.

Why don't you have any academic requirements to enter the program?

We believe that helping children get a strong start in school has many benefits down the road. We want to help children from families in need have access to a quality education in the first years — the most formative years, before their academic abilities might even be known. We also want to help students who may not be doing well in public schools and those who have learning differences. There is, however, a merit component to the MOST High School Scholars Program, with good grades being a major consideration for participation.

Is MOST making a difference?

Please see our Results page for information on this question.